Smothered Portobello Mushroom Fries

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Recipe by Ruled.me

Crispy, seasoned potato fries make the best side dish to burgers, steak or fried chicken. But because they are usually deep-fried in genetically engineered omega-6 vegetable oils, they may not be healthy for you.

Ruled.me has created an alternative recipe for potato fries, which uses portobello mushrooms. They may not be as crispy as deep-fried potatoes, but they’re healthier and even more delicious. This recipe also uses a number of spices and flavorings, so you can enjoy these “fries”  without mayo or ketchup. If you’re looking for a satisfying appetizer or snack, give this recipe a try.

Smothered Portobello Mushroom Fries

Ingredients:

2 large organic Portobello mushroom caps
1/2 cup organic Parmesan cheese, shredded
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 large organic egg, beaten
3 strips free-range bacon
1/4 cup grass-fed cheddar cheese, grated
1 tablespoon dried chives, to garnish

Procedure:

  • Heat oven to 425 degrees F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Slice the mushroom caps into one-fourth-inch-thick strips and cut the ends off at an angle to imitate a “french fry” cut.
  • In a small food processor, blend the Parmesan cheese and seasonings until the mixture is well-combined. Transfer the mixture to a shallow bowl or dish.
  • Beat the egg in a small bowl. Dip the mushroom fries in the egg to coat.
  • Carefully roll the mushrooms in the Parmesan mixture.
  • Place the mushroom fries on the prepared baking sheet and roast for about 10 minutes.
  • While the fries are baking, add bacon strips to a pan and fry over medium heat until crisp. Remove the bacon from the pan and allow to cool before crumbling or dicing with a knife.
  • Remove the fries from the oven and cover with shredded cheese and crumbled bacon.
  • Bake for an additional five minutes or until cheese is melted. Top with dried chives and serve.

Replace Potato Fries With These Nutritious and Satisfying Smothered Mushroom Fries

Ordering fast food such as french fries is convenient, but know that convenience also makes it easy to predispose yourself to these foods’ harmful effects. While potatoes, which are widely consumed around the world, contain vitamin C, B vitamins, potassium and fiber, they are also a carbohydrate-rich food that produces a cancer-causing and potentially neurotoxic chemical called acrylamide when cooked at a high temperature.

Conventionally grown potatoes may also contain pesticide residues like chlorpropham. In fact, potatoes are on the “Dirty Dozen” list of the Environmental Working Group’s 2018 Shopper's Guide to Pesticides in Produce.

So instead of giving in to your fried potato cravings and putting your health at risk, you can enjoy guilt-free snacking with mushroom fries. The portobello mushroom, also known as portabella, is a large mushroom with a fully open cap, reaching up to 6 inches in diameter. It is actually a mature crimini mushroom that’s harvested three to seven days later than criminis.

Because of its deep and meat-like texture and flavor, it is often used as a meat alternative and added in salads, wraps, and spreads. A piece of portobello mushroom, which is about 84 grams, contains the following nutrients:

  • Protein
  • Calcium
  • Fiber
  • Phosphorus
  • Folate
  • Vitamin D

Why You Should Consume Only Free-Range Bacon

Bacon’s saltiness and crunchiness add flavor and texture to this recipe. But like any other type of meat, you should be cautious of its source as processed meat like bacon is associated with the risk of cancer.
If you choose to eat bacon every once in a while, you should ensure that it comes from organic, pasture-raised pigs to reduce your risk of pathogenic contamination. Pork from pigs raised in factory farms may be infected with drug-resistant superbugs because of antibiotics given to them, which may cause food poisoning and infectious diseases.

To add, make sure that they’re nitrate-free because nitrates may convert into carcinogenic nitrosamines when heated or processed. Do this by checking the label and the meat itself. A pinker meat color could mean that the bacon contains chemicals like nitrates and nitrites.

This Recipe Won’t Be Flavorful Without These Herbs and Spices

Mushroom fries may be new to your taste, but once you’ve taken a bite of these tender treats, you'll surely want some more. Aside from bacon and Parmesan cheese, these herbs and spices make this recipe more flavorful and satisfying:

  • Chives — Fresh chives are commonly used to garnish dishes but they tend to become bitter when cooked. This recipe uses dried chives instead for a subtle onion flavor and a pop of color. You can make your own by placing chives on a tray and letting them dry in a well-ventilated area. Avoid putting them under direct sunlight. Once they are brittle, crumble the chives and store them in an airtight container.
  • Cayenne pepper — Although it may look like paprika, cayenne is the spice you need to use if you want a kick of spiciness in a dish. It is used to add flavor to curries, sauces, stews and egg, fish, meat and vegetable dishes. Cayenne pepper also contains vitamins A and C, which are both essential to your immune system.
  • Paprika — With paprika, remember that it is not necessarily spicy, as it ranges from sweet to smoky to hot. The kind of paprika required in this recipe is smoked, which gives a sweet smokiness flavor to the mushroom fries. Aside from being used as a flavoring, this crimson-colored spice may also be used as a garnish. If you’re after its flavor, though, you need to add it during the cooking process, as it only releases its flavor when heated.
  • Garlic powder —When garlic cloves are dehydrated and ground, they turn into hygroscopic powder, which requires proper storage to avoid flavor loss because it can easily absorb moisture. It is convenient to use garlic powder especially if you need to add a garlicky taste in your meals without having to peel and crush garlic cloves.

About Ruled.Me

Ruled.I was created by Craig Clarke, a blogger who originally struggled with weight problems. The website not only focuses on the ketogenic diet as a way to lose weight but as a lifestyle that can improve your quality of life. It contains dieting tips, strength, and endurance exercises and various recipes for people who are struggling with their weight and nutritional deficiencies.