How Your Relationship With Food Shapes How You Eat

How Your Relationship With Food Shapes How You EatOne way dysfunctional eating begins is when people start categorizing their food into good and bad categories.

 

Good foods become safe, easy to consume without guilt while bad foods become forbidden and only consumed in secret and with horrible feelings. Severe deficits in food intake can begin to skew the view of safe and unsafe foods.


Often long periods of food deprivation will lead to an overconsumption of a particular food. This food is now deemed dangerous or harmful because it caused a binge. In reality, the lack of overall intake resulted in the binge of food, but the disordered eating pattern and the unhealthy food relationship will not allow that view to be seen.


Does all of that sound too complicated? How about this?


You ate too much at lunch, so you decide to skip dinner. Then at dinner, you’re starving and eat way more than you need because you gorge on a pile of pasta pesto. Now you know it must be the pasta pesto. Pesto is just too tempting. Can’t eat that again, or you might overdo it. This is one way you can begin a dysfunctional relationship with food.


Those who perceive food as comfort will fall into the emotional eating trap, reaching for chips, ice cream, and pizza when they are stressed, angry, lonely, or bored, leading to guilt, shame, and regret.


Those who see food as something pleasurable will habitually overeat, which also leads to feelings of guilt, shame, and regret.


Many people simply are not in touch with the key concepts of healthy eating, such as portion control and moderation as these strategies elude those who struggle with weight and proper nutrition.


The examples are plentiful, but it’s important to focus on solutions so you can have a more healthy relationship with food.

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